What the heck is a Hyack?

The Hyacks
In 1861, the volunteer fire brigade in New Westminster, was named the Hyack Fire Brigade. Since then, many other local organizations have used the name “Hyack” in New Westminster.

For new residents, the word “Hyack” can be totally mystifying. I get asked about it a lot.

Many of you know I own and operate Hyack Interactive, which offers project management for digital communication projects for non-profits and small businesses.

When my then-business partner and I named Hyack Interactive, we wanted a name that was intrinsically “New West.” So, Hyack Interactive was born, and joined the ranks of Hyack-named businesses and groups such as Hyack Tire, Hyacks Football, and Hyack Swim Club, along with probably the two most well known iterations of “Hyack”: The Ancient and Honourable Hyack Anvil Battery and the Hyack Festival Association. Continue reading “What the heck is a Hyack?”

What does ‘Hyack’ mean anyway?

The Anvil Battery now, with the bright red uniforms from Hyack Company #1 (Photo: Will Tomkinson)
The Anvil Battery now, with the bright red uniforms from Hyack Company #1 (Photo: Will Tomkinson)

For almost 14O years, thousands of New Westminsterites have enjoyed celebrations like May Day, the famous Ancient Hyack Anvil Battery, parades down our main streets and the crowning of Miss New Westminster.  The Hyack Festival Association continues these New Westminster traditions that many people have enjoyed for their whole lives, introduces them to new generations and shares them with people from around the world. People enjoying the festivities and the city often wonder what the word ‘Hyack’ means and how it became such an important part of the language of New Westminster.

Throughout the 19th Century as Europeans began settling up and down the West Coast from Northern California to what would become B.C., they traded, worked with and learned from aboriginal people about the lands. Communication was often difficult because of the different languages of aboriginal people and the settlers. Throughout that time, a common language emerged to help the people communicate more successfully that took words from various languages and developed into what came to be known as Chinook Jargon. Although the exact origin of many of the words is unknown, many of them became very much a part of the common language used by settlers. Many Common phrases used at the time are still in use today or had things named for them. For example, Tyee meant a leader, Kimtah was looking back, a Skukumchuck was a strong waterway and Cultus meant worthless. Another important word in Chinook Jargon was Hyack, that meant swift, fast or to hurry up.

The Hyack Company #1 Band, celebrating with the Fire King on Columbia Street in the early years (IHP 0086)
The Hyack Company #1 Band, celebrating with the Fire King on Columbia Street in the early years (IHP 0086)

As the Royal Engineers and others in New Westminster started building the new town in the 1850s and 1860s, one of earliest and most important groups to be established was a volunteer fire department. In 1861, the “Hyack Company #1” was given its name to inspire the more than 50 men who volunteered to be part of a swift group who would hurry up when they were called into action. The motto of the brigade was “ready, aye, ready” that was inscribed in their headquarters on the north side of Columbia Street, just east what is now Sixth Street. Nearly 30 people were required to operate their original piece of equipment, the “Fire King”, a large hand operated pump bought in 1863. Any one person could only operate it about 10 minutes, but in the early years of New Westminster, it was said that the “work was completed by those Skukum (Chinook Jargon for Strong) volunteers in their battles with the fire fiend” (an unidentified Fire Chief in the early 20th Century, from the New Westminster Museum and Archives).

As part of the very first Victoria Day celebrations, New Westminster residents wanted a 21 gun salute to celebrate the Queen’s Birthday on May 24. Because no cannons had arrived in the city to fire the salute early, the Hyack Company used gunpowder between anvils to fire the salute. As New Westminster residents know, the Ancient Hyack Anvil Battery became a very important part of celebrations that survive now. The bright red uniforms that people see worn today for the Anvil Battery are a representation of the original dress uniforms worn by the Hyack Company #1. Some say that the swiftness of the Anvil Battery may also be why the name Hyack became associated with the events.

A celebration of the Hyack Anvil Battery from about 110 years ago (IHP0480)
A celebration of the Hyack Anvil Battery from about 110 years ago (IHP0480)

The proud Hyack Company became a very important part of other city events early on in the history of New Westminster. When the Fire King arrived in 1863, many of the members of the Royal Engineers Band were part of the volunteer firefighters, so dressed in their uniforms and performed for the residents to celebrate. They later became known as the Hyack Band, so when May Day began in 1870, they became a very important part of the celebrations. Ever since then, the band, the Anvil Battery and other parts of the original Hyack Company #1 became recognized and acknowledged as a key part of all the events each May, with their uniforms being a representation of the history of the festivities.

After 100 years of celebrating the special events each May, the Hyack Festival Association was established in 1971 to preserve the historical spirit of the events and to organize them into a full and rich celebration of New Westminster. The name was taken as a remembrance to the Hyack Company #1 and their historic significance in the city. The Association’s endeavours have preserved the name and helped keep the meaning and significance of the Chinook Jargon and keep the word within the language of New Westminster ever since the first settlers arrived and carry it on into the future.