Solar-powered signs nag drivers to slow down in school zones

If there’s one issue that everyone in New West agrees is a problem, it’s traffic. The problem of drivers speeding through residential areas and, worse, school zones, is just one of the many traffic issues that New Westies like to complain about.  The city has resolved to do something about it. Permanent solar-powered signs haveRead More

If there’s one issue that everyone in New West agrees is a problem, it’s traffic. The problem of drivers speeding through residential areas and, worse, school zones, is just one of the many traffic issues that New Westies like to complain about. 

The city has resolved to do something about it. Permanent solar-powered signs have been installed near Tweedsmuir, McBride, Howay and Robson Elementary schools that nag drivers to check their speed. 

Says the city’s news release: 

The new speed reader boards will remain in operation around the clock. On school days, from 8am to 5pm, if a vehicle is traveling over the posted school-zone limit of 30km/hour the words “Slow Down!” will flash as an immediate signal to drivers to watch their speed. Outside of school hours, the reader boards will flash when a driver exceeds the regular posted speed limit of 50km/hour.

I think it’s a great idea! New West could be the ultimate British nanny city, the Mary Poppins of Metro Vancouver. We could even expand the program with signs installed at the Burnaby border that scan for Metrotown-purchased goods and chide returning New West folk with the words, “SHOP LOCAL!” Or how about billboards on Columbia St. targeting Vancouver-bound commuters that read, “PARK YOUR SUV AND TAKE SKYTRAIN!”

Briana Tomkinson

Briana Tomkinson is a Montreal-based writer and original founder of Tenth to the Fraser. She really likes to write letters by hand.

Briana Tomkinson is a really valued member of the Tenth to the Fraser community. Interested in joining our pool of writers? Please see these submission guidelines.

2 comments

  1. Do you really think shooting radar towards kids walking to school is a good idea?

    Radar sends a pretty wide signal and it goes for quite a distance. I am glad I don't live near it.

Comments are closed.

Tenth to the Fraser