Kids in Motion is Awesome Fun

Jen checks out Kids in Motion, a Creative Arts Studio for 0-8 year olds in Sapperton run by Natasha Young.

When we moved over to Sapperton, I spent some time and checked out all the local shops on the “strip” along E. Columbia had to offer. Since then, we’ve said bon voyage to Pedagogy (soon to reopen down at River Market) and to Karmavore (now in spacious new digs on Columbia at 6th Street). I understand from local shopper Sheila that Opulence is the next to go – although, sadly, relocation is not what’s taking them out of the area – they are closing down. We’ve also said hello to Graze Market and fallen in love with their pulled pork, and are looking forward to what fills the space where Pedagogy and Karmavore were (one of the signs says it is “Puppets and Gore” – what the heck?).

One of the constants in the strip is Kids in Motion, a kids’ dance and play creative arts studio run by Natasha Young, a bubbly, approachable and understanding business owner.

The shop is pretty non-descript on the front – tucked into a storefront between a pizza joint and the always interesting Cadeaux, with security bars and a few bulletin boards chock full of notices in the windows.  We walk past it often enough and when I walked by in the late fall last year, I noticed an ad for classes. They were 4 weeks long and offered at $45, and with an indecisive flip-flopper of a toddler who is in love with something one day and can’t bear the thought of it the next, I thought that 4 weeks was a great commitment level for us.

Bubbles are a part of the fun!

Natasha offers classes ranging in age from babies to age 8, varying in subjects from general rhythm to ballet, tap, hip-hop, or jazz, as well as parties for the younger set. The classes for the younger guys are a parent participation class. Check out the course descriptions and schedules for more info. The space is clean, bright, and very kid-friendly.

We chose a class called Rhythm Kids for kids ranging in age from 1.5-3. My son’s on the top end of that age range, but he’s never really taken classes before and since he’s not in daycare, I thought the social time with some other kids would be really beneficial.  Natasha follows the same basic format for each class, and the consistency seems to pay off with the kids as they seem to follows her instructions remarkably well. The classes are well timed at 45 minutes long. The room is filled with lots of different props – drums, pinwheels, butterfly wings, ribbon sticks, and shakers among others and almost all classes include some free time on a huge range of instruments.

Stella never stops smiling.

For most of the first two classes Kale really wasn’t happy. He hung off me and didn’t want to participate but didn’t want to leave when suggested it. But toward the end of the second class, something clicked and he was spinning, singing, clapping, banging on drums, and generally just exploring with all the other kids. By the end of class three, he was begging me to “do it again!” and on our way home from the final class he admitted, in the way that only sad toddlers can portray, he “missed Miss Natasha”. Because it had been November and December, a lot of the classes were holiday and winter themed.

I decided to sign up for the next session of classes because he’d enjoyed it so much, only this session is 10 classes long ($110). Because it’s longer and Christmas is over, we’re going to be exploring a new theme each week like bugs, things that move, animals, jungles, and other fun stuff. We’re at week three now, and Kale is so excited to see Miss Natasha when we arrive. We talk about it ALL day (before and after class), and longingly wish for the next class to come. He sings, he dances, he plays with all the props. He loves rhythm class, bunny ears and all.

Bunnies hopping through the garden.

Check out Kids in Motion at 465B E. Columbia Street in Sapperton. Call 604-970-7945 or check them out online at kids-inmotion.ca

Jen Arbo

Jen Arbo is the editor and co-publisher of Tenth to the Fraser. She's been writing for the site since 2007 and lives in Sapperton with her family. A project manager at heart, she also operates Hyack Interactive, a digital communications company. Find her on Twitter or Instagram.

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7 comments

  1. Thanks for this post Jen. I checked out their schedule and they seem pretty full, I imagine because they create customer appreciation such as found in you. I'll have to try to make some classes there work for my Boys some day.

  2. Jen,
    Any business on any street is good. And this sounds great considering the number of small children in New West.
    Sapperton, like 12th Street, like downtown, are continually going through transition. New businesses open and close regularly.
    Why? you might ask. Parking issues, high business taxes to support our $100,000 plus salaries which eats up 78% of all taxes. Lack of Economic Developement initiatives, instead introducing anti business policies like the unions " Fair living wage policy" which does nothing for the poor and only prevents contracting out in the city. No city should dictate wages to businesses.

    I was in for a Graze's pulled pork… Fantastic!!. I also approached them on purchasing some of the Village Coffee Lounge equipment as he has the ideal window and corner space for a coffee shop. Selling my brand of coffee, undisputed as the "Best in New West" would be a winner……. "Go Grazy Coffee" They have parking and street scape, what more would you need? Take up a petition, blog for support! Go Girl Go! Get your kids in motion and pop over for a coffee!

    1. Well, John, to be fair the living wage policy isn't dictating wages to businesses in New Westminster. They're dictating wages to themselves and to certain contractors who perform physical work on City property. http://www.newwestcity.ca/2010/05/13/living_wage_… I agree that the "economic development" needs work in our city – I am so tired of dollar stores, cheque cashing joints, and bridal boutiques. It's why I write reviews of great businesses here on 10th. However, I think (and this isn't a reflection of any business in particular) sometimes businesses close down because the business person isn't making smart, sound choices. There is an element of risk to running a business and I think if you choose to take on a business, you need to be prepared for risk (and reward) regardless of the civic climate. Also, if you're selling crap, no amount of initiatives and great parking is going to change the fact that you're still selling crap.

    2. And hey, as long as Graze can use that coffee machine to churn out great chai, steamed milk, and hot chocolate, I am ALL OVER a coffee shop at Graze. 🙂

      1. Jen
        Point taken but not agreed with. We can discuss at another time and place…. maybe a post on the "unfair living wage" is due. I am a senior, and if single, would love a job flipping burgers for Parks C and Rec at $16 + I could add that to my pension. Oh wait! Parks employees raking leaves get $24 + 12% benefits… I'll take that. Great wage for a single dude based on the wage requirement of a family of four.
        John

  3. That does sound like awesome fun! Not in the cards for now, but maybe one day I'll have the time to take the kids! I wonder if she does birthday parties …

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